Free Resources

Resolution 6-10: Guidance On Contraceptive Methods

Resolution 6-10: Guidance On Contraceptive Methods

The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod’s Sanctity of Human Life Committee offers this document in response to Resolution 6-10 placed before the Synod’s 2004 convention.
Reproductive Ethics: A Summary

Reproductive Ethics: A Summary

We need to distinguish the critique of reproductive technologies from a criticism of people we may know who have made use of them. This information is offered to Christian couples to help them think about the possible use of reproductive technologies.
Not Alone

Not Alone

To our brothers and sisters who long to be parents: You are not alone. Not only are others like you — wanting children to serve and love, to cry and laugh with — but also Mary’s Son. Jesus bears this burden with you.
What About Embryo Adoption?

What About Embryo Adoption?

He is a child. One sperm fertilizes one egg in a petri dish, and a human life begins. He has 23 pairs of chromosomes. He has his own genetic traits and family history. He is a human being for whom Jesus Christ died, just like you and me. He is a gift to his parents from the Lord. “Behold, children are a heritage from the Lord, the fruit of the womb a reward” (Ps. 127:3).
The Gift Not Given

The Gift Not Given

This state of barrenness is our reality, and it is painful. Yet, ceaselessly, God gives gifts. He reminds of His sufficient grace.
The Child As a Gift of God

The Child As a Gift of God

Commended by the 2019 LCMS convention, this paper examines the many subtle ways that American culture rejects life as a fundamental gift of God and instead sees “having a baby” as a human accomplishment.
What About…Living Together Without Marriage?

What About…Living Together Without Marriage?

This resource is reprint of a tract from The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod’s “What About …” series. Pastors and congregations will want to work patiently and lovingly with couples caught up in the sin of living together without marriage.
The Social Doctrine of the Augsburg Confession and Its Significance for the Present

The Social Doctrine of the Augsburg Confession and Its Significance for the Present

In this essay, Hermann Sasse describes the theology of the “two regimens” (more commonly called “two kingdoms”) of the state and the church. Sasse addresses the widespread misunderstanding of the kingdom of God.
Christian Citizenship

Christian Citizenship

We are all citizens of two kingdoms. One is the kingdom of this world. Christian citizenship will advance the cause of movements that strengthen the guarantees of order and law, keep separate church and state, keep sacred the institution of marriage, and protect the morals of youth.
The Christian: A Citizen of Two Kingdoms

The Christian: A Citizen of Two Kingdoms

Every person is a subject of two kingdoms — one spiritual, the other earthly. Both the godly and ungodly are citizens of an earthly kingdom or country. However, Lutherans are not always as great a blessing to their country as they should be.
Vocation: Fruit of the Liturgy

Vocation: Fruit of the Liturgy

In Martin Luther’s teaching on the dual existence of the Christian, we observe a connection with the teaching of the two governments or two kingdoms. The Christian does not seek to escape or withdraw from the world as in monasticism, but rather he lives out his calling in the particular place where God has located him.
Masks of God

Masks of God

Luther puts it strongly: Vocations are “masks of God.” On the surface, we see an ordinary human face — our mother, the doctor, the teacher, the waitress, our pastor — but, beneath the appearances, God is ministering to us through them. God is hidden in human vocations.